"Somewhere Below 14th & East: The Lost Photography of Karen O'Sullivan" by Ray Parada

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Set for a Spring release in 2018, DiWulf Publishing House proudly presents the lost photography of Karen O'Sullivan as curated by her close friend: artist and author Ray Parada. Full of previously unseen photos of New York City street and youth culture of the early-'80s, Somewhere Below 14th & East is a gritty, unblinking look into the streets of the Lower East Side and the fertile, vibrant subcultures that ran rampant under NYC's decay. Featuring photos of The ClashAllen GinsburgThe MisfitsThe Beastie Boys, and many more. 

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"Urban Styles: Graffiti in New York Hardcore"
  by Freddy Alva

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New York

We are very excited to announce the coming of Freddy Alva's first book; a chronicle of the merging of two important New York subcultures: Hardcore music and graffiti art. Slated for release on October 31st 2017, Urban Styles can be ordered here. Filled with dozens of interviews with writers and musicians who all played a part in the vibrant underground scenes of 1980s New York as well as memorializing some of the dopest pieces ever put up in the city, Urban Styles looks to further preserve two vital, visceral art forms in their heyday.

 

  This is how DiWulf began.  The 2014 release of No Slam Dancing was the culmination of over 10 years of work for Steven and Amy.  No publisher would touch it.  They wanted to change the name, make it shorter, not be in the oral history format, and the list goes on.   Nope, nope, and nope.  Being old school punkers, we told The Man where to get off and put out ourselves.  The book did very well, proving that there is an audience of people who want to know the past to see the future. 

 

This is how DiWulf began.  The 2014 release of No Slam Dancing was the culmination of over 10 years of work for Steven and Amy.  No publisher would touch it.  They wanted to change the name, make it shorter, not be in the oral history format, and the list goes on.  

Nope, nope, and nope.  Being old school punkers, we told The Man where to get off and put out ourselves.  The book did very well, proving that there is an audience of people who want to know the past to see the future.