history

ON THIS DATE IN CITY GARDENS HISTORY: August 17, 1985 - Randy Pisses Off The Replacements

The Replacements    at City Gardens. Photo by    Liz Sheehy

The Replacements at City Gardens. Photo by Liz Sheehy

The Replacements/The Rettmans – August 17, 1985

Joe Z. (City Gardens soundman): Randy had this band The Rettmans, and they opened the show. I was in charge of watching the dressing room, so nobody went up the stairs and bothered The Replacements. Before The Rettmans played, Randy said, “We’re going to do something interesting tonight: we’re going to play nothing but Replacements songs.” I thought, well, that’s going to be interesting. The Rettmans go up and play a Replacements song… and then another one. [Replacements frontman] Paul Westerberg comes down from the dressing room, walking real slow, scratching his head, looking at me. He peeked around the stairs and saw them playing, then goes back up. The Rettmans play a few more Replacements songs and then Paul comes down again, but now he’s all pissed off. He said to me, “What are those guys doing?” I said, “I don’t know; they’re playing Replacements songs.” He looked at me and said, “What the fuck am I supposed to play?!”

Randy Now    drumming for    The Rettmans

Randy Now drumming for The Rettmans

Ken Hinchey (City Gardens regular): Bob [Stinson, Replacements guitarist] was onstage wearing a housecoat, and when he bent over you could see everything hanging and dangling.

Randy Now: He used to wear a diaper a lot too, although he never did that at City Gardens. When they played down south, they would wear make-up, just to piss people off.

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Ken Hinchey: During the “drunk shows,” they would take requests, and everyone would yell out songs. Paul Westerberg would yell out, “Give me a band that starts with a k!” Someone would yell, “The Knack!” and they’d play “My Sharona.” Most people yelled for Replacements songs or classic rock, but one time I yelled out “Ghostbusters!” Paul looked over at me and chuckled.

Literary Discussions: Jersey Beat's James Damion Interviews DiWulf's Steve DiLodovico

Literary Discussions: Jersey Beat's James Damion Interviews DiWulf's Steve DiLodovico

I’ve never been much of a PMA guy, so I’ve never been much of an advocate or cheerleader or the kind of person that gives life advice. To me, the PMA is a cop out – a Brad Goodman-like easy band aid for very deep, very complex situations that arise in life. It’s a slogan, not a solution…”

ON THIS DATE IN CITY GARDENS HISTORY: August 6 1989 Bad Brains/Leeway AKA The Hottest Show EVER

Bad Brains    at City Gardens. Photo by    Ken Salerno

Bad Brains at City Gardens. Photo by Ken Salerno

Bad Brains/Leeway – August 6th, 1989

Rob Vitale (Black Train Jack): Leeway had played CBGB and the next show was at City Gardens. [Leeway’s] Eddie came out with this sign that said, “Trenton or Bust.” And then the Bad Brains come on and out comes [Bad Brains frontman] HR with the same sign: Trenton or Bust.

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Steven DiLodovico (author): Hottest show ever. EVER. To this day people still talk about how goddamn hot that show was.

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Jamie Davis (City Gardens regular): Bad Brains only played about five songs because the power kept going out. It was so hot in there that the power would blow out. Leeway was amazing. The best part about Leeway was that the bouncers were all outside and everyone realized it, and everyone was stagediving like crazy through the whole Leeway set. There were so many people outside trying to get in, so that’s where all the bouncers were. Everyone was going nuts. Leeway blew them away, anyway. The Bad Brains came on late, played, like, two songs, said it was too hot, and stopped.

Leeway    at City Gardens. Photo by    Ken Salerno

Leeway at City Gardens. Photo by Ken Salerno

ON THIS DATE IN CITY GARDENS HISTORY: BAD RELIGION/ALL/VISION/SHADES APART JUNE 29TH 1990

The following excerpt is taken from “No Slam Dancing, No Stage Diving, No Spikes: An Oral History of the Legendary City Gardens” by Amy Yates Wuelfing and Steven DiLodovico

Dave Vision at City Gardens. Photo by Ken Salerno

Dave Vision at City Gardens. Photo by Ken Salerno

Bad Religion/ALL/Vision/Shades Apart – June 29, 1990

Dave Franklin (Vision, vocals): Shades Apart opened up, then we went on, then ALL, and then Bad Religion. The night before Shades Apart opened for Bad Religion at the [punk club] Anthrax in Connecticut. I went up with the Shades Apart guys to see Bad Religion, and there were maybe 150 people there, 200 tops. I was hanging out talking to [Bad Religion’s] Brett Gurewitz and Greg Hetson, and they were both like, “Man, I thought we were a little bit bigger on the East Coast.” And I was like, “This is kind of a weird place.” I mean, it was a great place to play—totally cool people—but was hit-or-miss. I said, “Tomorrow night in Trenton, at City Gardens, the show is going to be off the charts.” When the next night came and we pulled into City Gardens, there was already a line around the building. Then the Bad Religion guys pulled up in their van. The first thing Brett said to me was, “You weren’t kidding!” The place was already sold out.

Bad Religion at City Gardens. Photo by Ken Salerno

Bad Religion at City Gardens. Photo by Ken Salerno

Peter Tabbot (Vision, guitar): This was another amazing City Gardens show. Bad Religion are/were…well…BAD RELIGION. One of my favorite bands, and we were all so psyched to share a stage with them in Trenton. They had pretty much come back from the dead just a couple of years before with the release of Suffer and No Control. This may have been their Against the Grain tour, and they had totally reestablished themselves as the smartest, best punk-rock band around. ALL just had a release or two out at the time, I think, and they were still kind of riding the coattails of The Descendents popularity while generating their own fan base with their kind of prog-punk melodic style. But they were definitely a good draw on their own. With us and Shades Apart, even though we were local bands, we both had a significant following. The show was packed. I would never, ever throw my band into a conversation about the great shows you would catch routinely at City Gardens, but objectively, it was a pretty good bill in 1990. It was typical of what Randy would do: four bands, each of whom has a significant audience psyched to see them for $7 or $8. Randy would put that together every single weekend, for seemingly years on end. You’d get two, three, or even four national touring acts on the same bill, and then the next night you’d get another fantastic show. Maybe it would be hardcore/metal one night, and then punk/indie the next night, but always amazing shows for just a few bucks. What I remember most about shows like this Bad Religion show at City Gardens [is that] you knew a fair number of the people. And you often went to whatever shows were happening on the weekend, even if it wasn’t a band or style that you closely identified with. A place where you knew the bouncers and the bartenders. I would imagine that this happened, to a lesser degree, at places like CBGB or The Ritz in New York, but those places didn’t have that same feeling. As large as City Gardens was, and as many people as you’d see there for bigger shows, it always felt like someone was having a great show in your backyard. That is, if your backyard happened to be the bowels of Trenton. This show is a really good example of Randy pairing great national acts with some pretty decent local bands.

Scott Reynolds (ALL, vocals): I remember the stage smelled like puke all the time. We’d come in and load in and every time we’d be like, “God, it smells like puke up here!” I mean it was really, really strong. It was really gross, and you could smell it while you were playing. It was part of the charm, I guess.

ALL at City Gardens. Photo by Ken Salerno

ALL at City Gardens. Photo by Ken Salerno

Dave Franklin: That was a great show. I recall I was in back bar and the Shades Apart had just finished. The crew was setting up Vision’s equipment, and [Vision bassist] Kevin was there with his brother and a bunch of other people I knew. I wasn’t in the conversation, but I was probably three or four people away from the conversation, and I could hear Kevin saying, “Wait ‘til Vision goes on, this place is gonna’ go CRAZY!” And sure enough, we went on and the place just went absolutely crazy. Blink of an Eye was out, and we were already like the house band. Everybody knew our songs and went nuts! Bad Religion and ALL were amazed by the crowd. 

Scott Reynolds: That was always one of my favorite places to play. We had big shows there.

Jeremy Weiss (City Gardens regular): The show was sold out. This is a true story: I was a very resourceful kid. I knew how [clubs] worked because I’d started booking shows, and I knew back then that bouncers would just as soon check IDs at the local bars as they would at City Gardens. I also knew they were susceptible to bribes. So, I walked around the back, I knocked on the door, and this towering individual popped his head out and said, “What?” I said, “I’ll give you $100 to let us in.” He didn’t say one word, nodded, put his hand out. I gave him $100 and me and four of my friends jetted right into the show while 275 other people stood out front, bummed out. We got into that show and were completely blown away. It was so packed that it was raining inside the club.

Shades Apart at City Gardens. Photo by Ken Salerno

Shades Apart at City Gardens. Photo by Ken Salerno

Scott Foster (1124 Records): I caught just about every ALL show that came through there. They were one of my favorites. That night we were waiting in line outside, and I saw some guys playing catch with a baseball. One of the guys missed it and the ball rolled over to me, so I picked it up, and, when I went to give it back to him, I realized it was [ALL’s] Karl [Alvarez] and Scott [Reynolds] playing catch. Karl said, “You wanna take over for a second?” and he gave me his glove. I played catch with Scott Reynolds for ten minutes while Karl did something else.